Register! Free Walking Tour – Activism in Bloomsbury

Well, apparently it is already the month of July.  I’m not quite sure how that happened, but it means our 13-month Heritage Lottery Fund outreach project is wrapping up at the end of the month! While we will be continuing the public engagement programme here in the Archives (more on that later), we’re really looking forward to what July has to offer, including…

A free walking tour: Activism in Bloomsbury

walkingtour

See the full poster here.

Join us for a playful, interactive stroll, as you’re guided by artist Ella Phillips.  Explore corners of Bloomsbury as you hear about the lives and histories of local activists from the past and the methods they used to promote their causes.  From  women’s suffrage, to slavery abolitionists, to personal privacy, and LGBTQ rights, no aspect of active citizenship is off-limits.

Spaces are limited, so email me at alexandra.hall@ioe.ac.uk, indicating which walk you’d like to attend on Saturday 19 July 2014 (either 11am or 2.30pm) and reserve your spot!

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Reminiscence Workshop: Told & Untold Stories

This space has far too quiet lately!  We’ve been busy delivering workshops as well as preparing for several new exciting projects, including a new exhibition, upcoming walking tours, and gearing up for new community-led projects.  I’ll update more on that later, but for now, a recent reminiscence workshop we held…

We all know that archives are a necessary stop for many historical researchers and family historians, looking to gather information.

At the same time, archives (with their many stories, both familiar and unfamiliar) are also catalysts for hearing, sharing, and gathering the experiences of others. With this in mind, we held a reminiscence workshop, Told & Untold Stories: Protecting London’s Children During the Second World War, here in the IOE Archives during May.

Evacuees  Girls Day School Trust Archive Collection

Evacuees
Girls Day School Trust Archive Collection

The event, offered in conjunction with the Raphael Samuel History Centre’s month-long heritage festival, London at War, explored the experiences of London ‘s children, along with the adults working to keep them safe. We uncovered untold stories from our
archive collections, and heard from participants’ own histories, while lecturers and PhD candidates shared their research.

Discussion often revolved around the theme of evacuation: those who stayed in London and the UK, and those who went abroad. Attendee Margaret described the ‘mutual envy between the people who stayed and the people who went… My parents were a bit smug about not sending us to America or Canada’.

Reminiscence Session

Reminiscence Session

Meg, who was evacuated to America, described her time abroad as a ‘huge educational experience’, having discovered other views. Margaret echoed those sentiments, recalling a friend who returned with surprise that England was a monarchy. Mary
described her childhood in Wimbledon, and the amount of bombing she and her family experienced.

We had our own collections on display: from the bomb damage of schools and the implementation of air raid precautions found in the Girls Day School Trust
collection, to the National Union of Women Teachers and their support of teachers sent to teach evacuated children. Teachers wrote to the NUWT, frustrated at being separated from their former pupils, others wrote to express how enjoyable the experience had been. Upon returning to a crowded London school following the war, one teacher complained of the ’44 hooligans’ she had in her class.

More than anything, the NUWT and its members were concerned about the impact of war on their students.

The shadow of war has darkened our personal and professional outlook; its effect on the education of our children is one of the gravest of its menaces. Whoever made this war it was not the children, and it is our part to see that they suffer no more than can be helped from its horrors and deprivations
Ellen Hamlyn, London Unit President, NUWT
September 1940

A huge thank you to everyone who made the trip to the IOE to attend this session.  The only request from attendees was for a longer session, as everyone had so many compelling stories to share; so, we will definitely offer similar workshops in the future.  Also, a big thanks to the Girls Day School Trust alumnae network for sharing this event with their members!  While we have GDST archives in our collections, it was great to hear the experiences of GDST alum, firsthand.

These reminiscences are in the process of being made available as audio oral histories online, so keep your eyes peeled! If you know of a group that would be interested in a reminiscence workshop using the IOE archives, please send me an email at alexandra.hall@ioe.ac.uk, or call 020 7911 5483.

‘Educating Londoners’ Event at London Metropolitan Archives

On Friday 9 May, 2014, along with London Metropolitan Archives (LMA), we are holding a study day conference, Educating Londoners: Sharing Experiences in the Archives, taking place at LMA.

Join us for a day of talks, recollections and document viewing to explore the stories of Londoners and their education. LMA partners with the Archives at the University of London’s Institute of Education to inspire discussion and reflection on education in London in the 20th century. From school architecture to school yard play, teacher unionism to after school detention, school dinners to curriculum reform, this day’s timetable can cover it all.

Places can be reserved here, free of charge.

Architects & Buildings Branch Archive Collection

Architects & Buildings Branch Archive Collection

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Programme for the day

As the programme illustrates, subjects for the day will be quite varied, and we’re looking forward to hearing about attendee’s experiences with their own education, in addition to hearing from four very unique, engaging speakers…

Professor Jane Martin (University of Birmingham) is the School of Education’s Deputy Head with responsibility for Strategic Development and Head of Department of Education and Social Justice. She moved to Birmingham from the Institute of Education, University of London, where she was Head of Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. She has lectured in Education Studies, History, Sociology and Women’s Studies. Her publications include Women and the Politics of Schooling in Victorian and Edwardian England, winner of the History of Education Society (UK) Book Prize 2002 and Making Socialists: Mary Bridges Adams and the Fight for Knowledge and Power 1855-1939 (2010). Her books with Joyce Goodman include Women and Education 1800-1980 (2004) and a 4-volume set for Routledge Women and Education: Major Themes in Education (2011). She is a past editor of the journal History of Education, past president of the UK History of Education Society and was the Brian Simon BERA Educational Research Fellow for 2004/5. She is a member of the Education Sub-panel for the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) on behalf of the UK Higher Education Funding Councils and the holder of a British Academy / Leverhulme Small Grant: Caroline DeCamp Benn: A Comprehensive Life, 1926-2000.

Professor Michael Fielding: Currently Emeritus Professor of Education at the Institute of Education, University of London and Visiting Professor of Education at the University of Bristol, Michael Fielding taught for 19 years in some of the UK’s pioneer radical secondary comprehensive schools and for a similar period and with identical commitments at the universities of Cambridge, London and Sussex.

Widely published in the fields of student voice, educational leadership and radical democratic education, his latest book, co-authored with Peter Moss, Radical Education and the Common School – a democratic alternative (Routledge 2011) seeks to reclaim education as a democratic project and a community responsibility and school as a public space of encounter for all citizens. He has recently received a grant from the Leverhulme Foundation to continue his research on the life and work of Alex Bloom, from 1945-55 headteacher of St George-in-the East, Stepney, one of the most radical democratic secondary schools England has ever seen.

Dr Hilda Kean is former dean of Ruskin College, Oxford where she taught history for many years (and campaigned to keep their student archives from destruction!) She has published widely on cultural/public history/family history and non-human animals. Hilda’s numerous books include Deeds not Words. The Lives of Suffragette Teachers (Pluto,1990), London Stories. Personal Lives, Public Histories (Rivers Oram, 2004) and The Public History Reader (Routledge, 2013) edited with Paul Martin. She is currently writing a book for the University of Chicago Press on the animal-human relationship on the Home Front during the 1939 – 45 war. Hilda has run many workshops on researching and writing family history at the London Metropolitan Archives and conducts guided walks with a London animal theme. She can be contacted via her website http://hildakean.com/

Professor Ken Jones has been Professor of Education at Goldsmiths since 2010, having previously worked in London secondary schools, at the Institute of Education, and at Keele University. As a teacher, he was secretary of the Barking & Dagenham Association of the NUT and for 8 years a member of the union’s national executive.

As an academic, the main area of his current interest is education policy, and the conflicts around it. He writes about the economic and social crisis through which Britain, and other countries in Europe, have been living since the financial crash of 2008. He analyses the education policies developed by governments in this period, and the ways in which these policies are critiqued and challenged by those who do not share current policy orthodoxies. Some of his articles are about the ideas and practices developed in the radical education of the twentieth century; others look at more recent alternatives. His two latest, edited, books are ‘Education in Europe: the politics of austerity’ (free to download at http://radicaledbks.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/education-in-europe.pdf) and, with Catherine Burke ‘Education, Childhood and Anarchism; talking Colin Ward’.

 

We hope to see you there!  If you’d like any further details, please contact me at alexandra.hall@ioe.ac.uk. 

Study Day: “Anthem for doomed youth”?: exploring conflict and resolution through archives

Join us on Tuesday, March 25th 2014, for our annual Friends of Newsam Library & Archives’ (FNLA) Study Day.  This year’s event, “Anthem for doomed youth”?: exploring conflict and resolution through archives, considers the concepts of war, conflict and peace through the lense of learning and education. 

Document Reference: BDN/64

Document Reference: BDN/64

The day’s programme:

9.45-10.00 Welcome and Introductions (Sean Curran)
10.00-10.30 Activities in the Library and Archives (Sarah Aitchison)
10.30-11.30 Professor Stuart Foster Centenary First World War Battlefields Project
11.30-12.30 Dr Barry Blades, Teachers and the Great War, 1914-1919
12.30-13.30
Lunch (please bring your own).  Tea and coffee will be provided.
13.30- 14.30 Walter Lewis, Educating Service Children in the 20th Century
14.30-15.30 Alix Hall, Thinking Outside the Box: Using Archives to Teach Perspectives on Wartime
15.30-16.00 Archive showcase of relevant collections from the Library Special Collections and Archives

Where: Newsam Library & Archives, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London
When: Tuesday, 25 March 2014 from 09:30 to 16:00
Register for free tickets here.

Find out more about the Friends of Newsam Library & Archives, including how to become a member, here.

Friends Logo

#explorearchives Open Day at the IOE

archive blog

‘A world without archives is a world without memory’… It is with this that the National Archives (TNA) and the Archives & Records Association (ARA) kicked off an archive awareness campaign, ‘Explore your Archives’.  Archives across the UK and Ireland are inviting you to explore your own history and interests through their collections.

As part of the Explore your Archives campaign, we held an open day on Wednesday, November 20th, inviting students, staff and visitors into our office and reading room to take a look at a few of our collections.

We had two ‘story boxes’, which provided a glimpse into two of our collections.  We compiled a variety of documents, photographs and ephemera for a National Union of Women Teachers story box.  To juxtapose the NUWT’s rather sizable collection (which, after Kathryn Hannan’s cataloguing project, includes 404 archive boxes worth of material), we chose one of our smaller collections – of educator Mimi Hatton – which consists of one box that holds an amazing assortment of documents, tickets and photographs from Hatton’s life as an educator in Germany and founder of a girls’ SEN school.

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One of our visitors, Paul (hi, Paul!), takes a look at some of our teaching resources available for using archives in the classroom.  Paul comes from a family of teachers, and dropped in to see if anything may interest his sister, who by the sounds of it, has had quite the interesting career in education.

Being the Institute of Education, we also made sure to have a variety of teaching resources available to educators and trainee teachers:

Primary sources put to use

Primary sources put to use.

A big thank you to everyone who stopped by last Wednesday, and to TNA & ARA for organising the Explore your Archives campaign!  To see what other archives are up to, you can head here to the Explore your Archives homepage.

Archive Workshops Now Available!

Autumn 2013 Schools Programme

Following a summer of creating learning resources and workshop design, we are excited to offer four Key Stage 1-4 school sessions that are now available for booking.

The HLF project, New Perspectives, welcomes new audiences to explore social history through the archives, specifically using the collection of the National Union of Women Teachers.  Each workshop takes a hands-on approach and includes active citizenship; historical investigations; and visual, oral, and written activities to deliver engaging sessions linked to the National Curriculum.  Workshops and activities are offered for:
Schools and college groups; students at PRUs; youth groups; visits from home educated children.

And the four workshops on offer…

Clever Campaigners: Then & Now KS 1/2 Half Day or Full Day Workshop Using the IOE’s NUWT archive collection, students investigate the strategies and tactics of a historical campaign and get inspired to create their own.  As students explore how campaigning has changed over the past century, they begin their own 21st century campaign, deciding what they would most like to change about the world. (document reference UWT/G/2/60)

Clever Campaigners: Then & Now
KS 1/2 Half Day or Full Day Workshop
Using the IOE’s NUWT archive collection, students investigate the strategies and tactics of a historical campaign and get inspired to create their own. As students explore how campaigning has changed over the past century, they begin their own 21st century campaign, deciding what they would most like to change about the world.
(document reference UWT/G/2/60)

Campaign! Make an Impact KS 3/4 Half Day or Full Day Workshop Explore a historical campaign as inspiration to create your own!  Using the British Library’s Campaign! Make an Impact model, this workshop engages students with original documents in the NUWT archive.  Students investigate topics including facets of the NUWT equal pay campaign, social justice, and campaign tactics, while considering how these factors have changed over the past century. (document reference UWT/G/2/31)

Campaign! Make an Impact
KS 3/4 Half Day or Full Day Workshop
Explore a historical campaign as inspiration to create your own! Using the British Library’s Campaign! Make an Impact model, this workshop engages students with original documents in the NUWT archive. Students investigate topics including facets of the NUWT equal pay campaign, social justice, and campaign tactics, while considering how these factors have changed over the past century.
(document reference UWT/G/2/31)

Archive Explorers KS 1/2 Half Day Workshop In this interactive workshop, students take on the role of evidence-hunting historians as they explore the archive and develop their skills of historical enquiry and communication.  This workshop is a fun and engaging way to introduce students to primary sources and the role they play in learning about history. (document reference UWT/D/50/2)

Archive Explorers
KS 1/2 Half Day Workshop
In this interactive workshop, students take on the role of evidence-hunting historians as they explore the archive and develop their skills of historical enquiry and communication. This workshop is a fun and engaging way to introduce students to primary sources and the role they play in learning about history.
(document reference UWT/D/50/2)

History Makers KS 3/4 Half Day Workshop Taking a hands-on approach with our archive collection, students explore the difference between a primary and secondary source.  After investigating original documents in the archive, students become history makers and create their own secondary sources.  This session supports pupils’ understanding of how historians use different types of sources to gather evidence about the past. (document reference UWT/D/37/11)

History Makers
KS 3/4 Half Day Workshop
Taking a hands-on approach with our archive collection, students explore the difference between a primary and secondary source. After investigating original documents in the archive, students become history makers and create their own secondary sources. This session supports pupils’ understanding of how historians use different types of sources to gather evidence about the past.
(document reference UWT/D/37/11)

We will help you plan your session in a way which meets your group’s needs.  To discuss your ideas or to book a visit, please get in touch:
email: arch.enquiries@ioe.ac.uk
phone: 020 7911 5483

And it’s probably worth noting that, thanks to our grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund, all school sessions are offered completely free of charge.

Women’s Educational Union, Scotland

I couldn’t let St Andrews day pass without a blog post! Last year I talked about ‘The Word’ – the  journal of the United Socialist Movement which was edited and published by Guy Aldred in Glasgow. This year I’m going to stick to women teachers as I found a folder of material on the Women’s Educational Union.  They were the nearest equivalent to the NUWT in Scotland, fighting for equal pay for women teachers, and from the looks of their journal Pass It On they similarly campaigned on a range of feminist and equal rights issues.

©Institute of Education Archive

©Institute of Education Archive

The comment from the NUWT member reads

Just [received] from Scotland.  Good isn’t it. What do you think of a monthly sheet of [pass] like this! Beginning of paper.

From this you can see that it met with the approval of the NUWT! It might even have been part of the inspiration behind the NUWT starting The Woman Teacher just one year later in 1919.

This is just a quick post and the real purpose of it, asides from it being St Andrews Day, is that I can’t locate any archive collection of the Womens’ Education Union. So if anyone knows where their papers are held I’d love to know.  I can’t find any clues to where they’re held online – I do so hope they have survived!